The Monsters Weekly - Episode ASP.NET Monsters Episode 95 - Creating a RabbitMQ Windows Container

Docker is now fully sported on Windows 10. In this episode we’ll see what it takes to avoid installing RabbitMQ locally and, instead, use a Windows container. Keeping RabbitMQ in a container allows standing up a cluster on one physical machine, greater ability to experiment and a high degree of isolation. In the future we expect that a great deal of local development will leverage containers. 

MassTransit on RabbitMQ in ASP.NET Core

In the last post, we created an application which can send tasks to a background processor. We did it directly with RabbitMQ which was a bit of a pain. We had to do our own wiring and even our own serialization. Nobody wants to do that for any sort of sizable application. Wiring would be very painful on a large scale.

There are a couple of good options in the .NET space which can be layered on top of raw queues. NServiceBus is perhaps the most well know option. There is, of course, a cost to running NServiceBus as it is a commercial product. In my mind the cost of NServiceBus is well worth it for small and medium installations. For large installations I’d recommend building more tightly on top of cloud based transports, but that’s a topic for another blog post.

The Monsters Weekly - Episode 94 - React with Server Side Rendering

React is a fantastic view engine and one of its best features is that it can be attached to pre existing markup. This allows us to render out HTML on the server side and then hookup React to it once all the JavaScript has been downloaded and started. We can get the best of single page application and the best of full web applications. In this episode we mash on speeding up single page react applications on the server.

 

References

 

React.net Tutorial

Are they isomorophic or universal

Getting Started with RabbitMQ in ASP.NET

In the last post we looked at how to set up RabbitMQ in a Windows container. It was quite the adventure and I’m sure it was woth the time I invested. Probably. Now we have it set up we can get to writing an application using it.

A pretty common use case when building a web application is that we want to do some background processing which takes longer than we’d like to keep a request open for. Doing so would lock up an IIS thread too, which ins’t optimal. In this example we’d like to make our user creation a background process.

Creating a Rabbit MQ Container

I bought a new laptop, a Dell XPS 15 and my oh my is it snazzy. The thing I was most excited about was that I’d get to play with Windows containers again. I have 3 other machines in the house but they’re either unsuitable for containers (OSX running Windows in parallels) or I’ve so toally borked them playing with early betas of containers they need to be formatted and reinstalled - possibly also thrown into the sun.

So when I found myself presented with the question “how can we get into messaging in our apps for free?” I figured I’d crack open the laptop and build something with MassTransit. I found that MassTransit supports running on RabbitMQ. Why that sounds like a perfect opportunity to deploy RabbitMQ to a container. Only problem was that I didn’t really know how to do that.

Including a space in a path name in a Dockerfile